Archive for energizing factors

Dec
08

Simple Steps Can Dramatically Increase Participation in Innovation

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At the IP Business Congress Asia 2014 (IPBC Asia 2014), a collection of IP experts from around the world are here in Shanghai, China sharing best practices and advice to help fellow IP workers. Yesterday during a panel discussing ways to build a world-class in-house IP team, a comment from the audience provided a valuable example of how management can stimulate innovation in a company inexpensively. At Aruba Laboratories, a social event was held in which a number of people cam wearing a T-shirt that said “Thought Leader.” Before the event, such T-shirts had been ordered for every person who had submitted an invention disclosure in the past year. There was buzz about what the T-shirts might mean and why some were wearing them. Then an executive spoke and congratulated those with the shirts, explaining what they meant. This simple, inexpensive act of recognition created an incentive to submit invention disclosures, which more than doubled that year. A 200% increase in invention disclosures shared–that’s a great return for a small amount of effort.

It’s important that management work to consistently recognize and show appreciation for the innovators in the company. It doesn’t require large bonuses, though I recommend that cash incentives also be used to recognize IP creation. Creating a culture of innovation above all requires the attention of management and leaders throughout the company.

There are many other issues to consider. For example, the attitude of the Legal Department in interacting with inventors can affect inventor attitudes for good or bad. When IP attorneys are aloof and bureaucratic, it can be a barrier. When they interact regularly with innovation teams and get to know and like the potential innovators of the company and take simple steps to encourage them, this can draw out important contributions. Facilitate innovation. Small things can become big barriers or big incentives. Pay attention to these factors and constantly gauge the health of your own innovation culture.

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Aug
02

Reduce Your IP Risks

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Innovators need to recognize that there are numerous IP risks that their new products and services may face. Sometimes a little attention to your supply chain, packaging, and business model can greatly reduce those risks. An excellent resource on this topic, from which I have drawn a couple of suggestions, is “IP risk assessments – a pragmatic approach
to avoiding problems” by Richard Baker in Intellectual Asset Management (November/December 2011), pp. 72-77.

One approach involves considering and segregating the risk that various aspects of your products and services expose you to. For example, if you are offering a product that includes wireless functionality, consider providing the wireless aspect as an optional add-on that can be purchased separately. If it’s part of the product, you could be sued for infringement of numerous wireless patents and risk paying a royalty of some percentage on the entire product. By moving the wireless features into a separate add-on, the risk becomes much lower, and if you are found to infringe, you’ll be paying a royalty on the sales of the add-on and probably not the sales of the primary device.

You can also reduce risk by exercising caution in how much you disclose (outside of confidentiality agreements) to the public on the details of your products and manufacturing methods. The less you disclose, the less likely someone with a patent looking to sue will spot you as a candidate.

Baker also advocates careful examination of your supply chain and consideration of the jurisdictions that might be involved if there is a suit. If you are shipping internationally, for example, you might want to avoid assembly and shipping from the US where you could be exposed to US lawsuits. Bakers observes that having operations elsewhere can greatly reduce risks. In England, for example, patent infringement suits are successful only about 6% of the time, and in Italy, IP lawsuits move at “glacial” speed through an inefficient court system that often takes longer than the life of the patent to be decided. The US is a great place to be a patent owner looking to sue an apparent infringer, compared to other nations, so take that into account.

Of course, a good patent clearance assessment and care to avoid infringing other patents should be part of your IP risk reduction strategy in the first place, but there is always uncertainty.

Reducing IP risks can help you have a higher chance of succeeding in the market place and overcoming innovation fatigue.

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Jan
18

Innovation Through Crowdsourcing: Congratulations to “All Your Shreds Are Belong to U.S.”

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Contests can be one of the most interesting innovation tools. With the right challenge and incentives, creative groups from across the world can help invent and innovate rapidly. The creativity of crowds fueled by a content was just demonstrated in the Shredder Challenge contest that was launched October 2011 by the U.S. government’s DARPA (the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency). DARPA wanted to know what could be achieved with computer tools in reassembling shredded documents to recover the originals. Since many different approaches were possible, this was an excellent candidate for crowdsourcing. Rather than hire a huge team for a short while to pursue many different paths, or use a small team pursuing many paths over a long period of time, just throw this one out to the crowds for healthy competition. The objective in this competition was to create a system for reconstructing shredded documents. The system would have to demonstrate success by reassembling the shreds from five documents whose shredded remains were posted on a website. As reported at Gizmag, the “All Your Shreds Are Belong to U.S.” team won the $50,000 prize for this contest by assembling all five documents two days before the Dec. 4 deadline. Given the hours that the winning team put into this competition, $50,000 was a very good deal for DARPA (and the American taxpayers) and not such a good deal for the winning team. If you consider all the thousands of additional hours put in by many other teams working on the competition, DARPA got quite a lot for a small investment.

Companies can and do this kind of thing as well, with varying degrees of success. Capturing the imagination of people with the skills needed for the problem is the key. Prizes help, along with fame and bragging rights. Intellectual property issues can get in the way for some companies. I’ll point to Local Motors as one of the leading examples of for-profit crowdsourcing. Their business model is sophisticated and highly refined, something I’ve written about here previously.

As for the hilarious title of the winning group, you might enjoy reviewing the history of the classic phrase, “All your base are belong to us.”

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Mar
17

Dark Energy and Dark Matter: What Astrophysics Can Teach Us about Innovation Success

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The Matter-Energy of the Cosmos is Mostly Dark Matter and Dark Energy

The Matter-Energy of the Cosmos is Mostly Dark Matter and Dark Energy

In recent years, scientists have been astounded to discover that the visible universe represents just a tiny fraction of the matter and energy that governs the cosmos. Based on the motion of stars and galaxies, strange “dark matter” must be present, increasing the gravitational tug on celestial bodies more than can be accounted for by visible matter. Further, based on the surprising discovered that the universe is expanding, not contracting under its own gravitational pull as expected, scientists have proposed that a strange, repulsive “dark energy” fills the cosmos countering gravity. The combined effect of these unseen entities, dark energy and dark matter, are so great, that they account for 96% of the matter and energy of the universe. In other words, the visible universe that we used to think is all there is actually is only a tiny fraction of what is there. What we see in the “cosmic org chart” accounts for only 4% of what really influences the cosmos.

It’s that way in the business world. too. Companies can create tidy org charts and draft neat process maps to describe how they work, but the unseen reality outside the visible systems may be what really dominates operations. Increasingly, experts in knowledge management are learning that easily overlooked and often invisible intangibles can dominate corporate value and performance. Numerous intangible transactions may be essential to the success of a company, including casual information sharing between trusted friends, helpful exchanges of tips and best practices between employees or between external partners and internal employees, or loyalty that is gained when people are included in decision making. The invisible linkages and hard-to-observe exchanges in a company’s internal an external ecosystems may be the real engines of value creation, regardless of what is on a process map or workstream. By not understanding the value of such intangibles, corporations can easily break key linkages and crush subtle engines of value creation.

Many companies focus on their “value chains” – a term popularized by Michael Porter in his seminal 1985 work, Competitive Advantage. The value chain describes the linear chain of events as materials and products move from sourcing through manufacturing and out to the market. It is a highly useful paradigm for manufacturing and was highly applicable to much of the economy in the era when Porter was doing his research. But since that time, the explosion of the knowledge economy has changed the way we work and create value. One of my favorite authors, Verna Allee, a revolutionary expert in knowledge management, has detailed the move from the value chain to modern ecosystems and Value Networks in her book, The Future of Knowledge: Increasing Prosperity through Value Networks (Burlington, MA: Elsevier Science, 2003). Verna Allee and Associates have introduced a clever, methodical tool called Value Network Analysis for analyzing and visualizing the transactions of intangibles and tangibles that affect a business.

After my training in Value Network Analysis by Verna and her associate, Oliver Schwabe, an exciting new perspective on business and human behavior opened up. I have been highly impressed with the power of Value Network Analysis and the insights that it can rapidly deliver for a company. The Value Network Analysis work that Innovationedge has done as part of larger projects for some of our clients has been a very exciting part of my work since joining Cheryl Perkins’ exciting company. We value the tool enough that we had Verna Allee speak at the 2008 CoDev conference to introduce other business leaders to the basic concepts behind Value Network Analysis. I’m very pleased to see a community emerging of people using Value Network Analysis and developing exciting tools for it.

Here are some resources that you may find helpful in further exploring this area:

Part of the initial output in Value Network Analysis are maps, called “holomaps,” showing human entities as nodes and transactions of tangible or intangible items between them. There is much that can be learned from such holomaps – a topic for later discussion. For now I’ll show you two sample holomaps I created to illustrate simple ecosystems. One shows several external nodes around a manufacturer and the other shows some structure within part of a corporation. For simplicity, the maps lack all the labels explaining the transactions.

Holomap of an External Ecosystem

Holomap of an External Ecosystem

Holomap of an Internal Ecosystem

Holomap of an Internal Ecosystem

One interesting approach is to use the “holomaps” you get in Value Network Analysis as tools for “what if” scenarios to explore what new partners might do for your business model, or what new business models might do for your ecosystem. Using holomaps to explore innovation ecosystems is a particularly fruitful approach for those doing open innovation and wondering who should be in their external ecosystem.

We have further information on this topic that we’d be happy to share with you. It’s certainly something you should look at to understand how business really works.

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Many creative corporate employees trying to innovate fail because they don’t fully grasp the social component of innovation. It is a social beast that must be fed and nurtured in many ways. It requires healthy relationships and many connections within your organization in order to help your peers and others recognize and act on the value you provide. For companies and individual inventors, developing the ties with the right people is again critical for innovation success, even at the earliest stages of your journey. The social component is often far more important that the technical components of innovation.

In this Pixetell video presentation, I briefly discusses the social side of innovation and give a plug for one of my favorite books, Never Eat Alone by Keith Ferrazzi, a resource that can help corporations and individuals better “feed innovation.” Keith’s book, coupled with the insights we provide in Conquering Innovation Fatigue, can help you build the right relationships you need for innovation success.

Dec
11

Overcome Innovation Fatigue with Fun!

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Ultimately, innovation in an organization works best when people are intrinsically motivated to innovate. The spread of an innovation–which is what innovation success is all about–also requires that target customers have an incentive to adopt and spread the innovation. FUN can be one of the most exciting incentives. Is your innovation sytem fun? Is your product fun? Have you considered how you can make it fun to drive interest and adoption?

Here’s a little video from The Fun Theory that shows how engineering fun can bring exciting results on the street. (Hat tip to inventor Fung-jou Chen.)

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InnovationFatigue.com is the official blog for the new book, Conquering Innovation Fatigue. Here we provide supplementary innovation, news, tips, updates, and, when needed, a correction or two, to keep those who are using the big on the inside edge for innovation success.