Archive for September, 2019

Among the many barriers to innovation success, one of the most painful and dangerous is rapidly gaining momentum in the United States due to an almost perfect storm of challenges to patent value. I speak of the blight of “efficient infringers,” the many companies, often large and politically influential, who make the cruel calculation that it’s more efficient to blatantly steal intellectual property from small opponents rather than pay for the property they want to use. The victims are the usual suspects, small companies, startups, and lone inventors. I use the word “suspects” deliberately for these victims, for they are suspects in an economic and media climate that increasingly views innovators as a key problem (e.g., “trolls”) for daring to own and perhaps even assert intellectual property against the benevolent titans of Silicon Valley and others who feel they are too big and too entitled to pay for what they take.

In the ruthless calculations of the efficient infringers, they recognize that if their infringing actions are detected, many patent owners won’t have the resources to challenge them in a long, costly battle. They recognize that if they are sued, the abundant new tools they have helped Congress create to kill patents may prevail and eliminate the problem in the USPTO’s Patent Trial and Appeal Board (PTAB), where one keep filing new attacks against the same patent over and over until the judges declare a patent to be abstract or otherwise invalid. The rules are stacked against the patent owner there, and just in case, it’s even possible for judges there to make rulings that favor companies with whom they have obvious connections, as in a former Apple employee making rulings in favor of Apple, with no apparent requirement to recuse themselves for conflict of interest.

If by some chance the patent owner prevails, the owner probably won’t be able to get a permanent injunction against the infringer due to a horrific Supreme Court ruling, Ebay, that removes one of the most important tools a patent owner should have to shut down an infringer. They will just have to pay some reasonable royalties and can avoid the real pain that deliberate infringement ought to bring. So in light of the slight risk of having to pay something to the occasional patent victor, many companies decide they can just do what they wish and treat potential patent losses as the relatively low cost of doing business. Efficient, but ruthless.

Gene Quinn of IPWatchdog.com accurately describes the dire situation in his latest post, “The Great Escape: Efficient Infringers Increasingly Seek to Abuse Antitrust Law.” Read the article and subscribe, for IPWatchdog is one of the most important voices daring to stand up against the anti-patent forces that are causing so much harm to our economy and such ongoing innovation fatigue for those who had the courage to invest in innovation. Efficient theft of the fruits of that innovation will hurt all of us in the end as innovation grows weary.

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